Check up on users

The goal

To monitor and gather feedback on the accuracy of one of our products, Symptom Checker, and understand how many users trust us.

My role

  • Led the UI, UX, and animations.
  • Worked alongside a lead designer, a content designer, 2 product managers, a delivery manager, and 3 developers.

The feature

A feedback loop

Symptom Checker was one of the products in the Babylon Health app, which was a tool that checks a user’s symptoms by asking questions and suggests potential conditions and recommended actions.

We wanted to create a feature that can help us gather feedback and data. So we could understand the accuracy of Symptom Checker and how many users trust us by the numbers of users who have followed our recommended actions.

From left to right: the homepage of the app, a question screen in Symptom checker, a result screen in Symptom checker.
From left to right: the homepage of the app, a question screen in Symptom checker, a result screen in Symptom checker.

Provide the feeling of care

Based on the previous research, we knew that the users liked to be checked up on, whether by their clinicians, friends and family as they felt like being cared for.

We believed that if our feature could provide a feeling of care, the users would be more likely to use it. So we decided to create a similar experience by sending a follow-up notification to the user who has recently completed an assessment in Symptom Checker. This notification would be the entry of the main feature flow.

The mobile follow-up notification.
The mobile follow-up notification.

Accuracy & adherence

After a user interacted with the notification, they would be taken to a questionnaire. Each question would change based on the user's answer in the previous question. Through these questions, we were hoping to find out if our suggested conditions in Symptom Checker were correct and the users have followed our recommendations.

The entire screen flow of the feature.
The entire screen flow of the feature.

Test the assumptions

User interview

We interviewed 5 different participants with various ages and genders to find out their feelings towards our follow-up notification. We presented a printed screen with the notification, asking them how they feel about notifications in general, what they expect to see/do if they received our notification and why they think we send this.

Most participants responded positively with the follow-up notification. They also liked messages to be more personalised and friendly by mentioning their name and symptoms.

“I’d appreciate this notification as it concerns my wellbeing.”

Usability testing

We ran 5 usability testing sessions, observing how the users interacted with a prototype. All the participants were able to complete the tasks and finish the flow without any issues. Most people also understood the value of the flow.

“I feel like the app is going to be better by understanding my condition.”

Card sorting

We also did a card sorting session to find out what voice and tone make the participants feel most cared for. Based on the result, we were able to refine the language in the design.

From left to right: a participant was using the prototype in the usabilty testing; a participant was moving a card in a card sorting session.
From left to right: a participant was using the prototype in the usabilty testing; a participant was moving a card in a card sorting session.

Refine the MVP

Once the design was done, me and a senior product designer facilitated a story mapping session with the team. The goal of the session was to refine our MVP so the developers and the data analyst would be able to finish the work within a 2-week sprint.

With their expertise, we were able to identify dependencies and requirements as well as the value each screen can bring. Finally, we prioritised the key screens and managed to finish the front-end development within a sprint.

Key learning

Taking the team through the process

This project was very collaborative. The team was involved in the whole process from problem framing, design, content, to development (front-end). The team was also informed of every decision made, so everyone was able to work very seamlessly and quickly.